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spoko

spoko

Currently reading

The Oligarchs: Wealth and Power in the New Russia
David E. Hoffman
The Master and Margarita
Mikhail Bulgakov, Diana Burgin, Katherine Tiernan O'Connor
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life
Arun Gandhi, Marshall B. Rosenberg
Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy
Eric Metaxas, Timothy Keller
Parting the Waters: Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement 1954-63
Taylor Branch
The Path to Power
Robert A. Caro
The Nature of Nebraska: Ecology and Biodiversity
Paul A. Johnsgard
Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original
Robin D.G. Kelley
Cutting for Stone
Abraham Verghese
The Prisoner's Wife: A Memoir - Asha Bandele I don't even know where to begin describing this book. It's absolutely stunning. One of my all-time favorite books, and one of very few that I would give a perfect ‘10' to.

All I knew going in was the basic blurb: asha bandele met, fell in love with, and eventually married a man who is doing 20 to life for murder. This is the story of that relationship. It sounded interesting, though honestly I wasn't sure I'd even bother finishing the book. I had high hopes, but they weren't based on much and I knew I could easily be disappointed. But the writing is so powerful and direct, you cannot help but sink into bandele's story. It's so much more than the story of a woman who fell in love against all odds. bandele writes with such insight and honesty, and you find yourself moving through love, power, struggle, heartbreak, joy, hope, misery, sex, birth, death, discovery, and hundreds of other states. The story is relentless, and yet flows with absolute grace.

I'm not doing it justice, but what a stunning book. Seriously, I'm almost speechless with its beauty. Of course, I would recommend it to just about anyone. With one slight caveat, and it's not a fault with the book in my opinion, but it's something I'd add to the recommendation. That is that several people have mentioned when they started this book that they didn't think they'd finish it because her writing is just too . . . much. Too poetic or too flowery or something. I noticed that as well. And I can't say that it lost that as the book went on, but after a while you see that it really works. She talks about some really intense things in the book, and her style of writing really helps carry it without getting too mired down. So I guess I'd just say this: If all that's bothering you is her writing style, keep reading. I think you'll find that you're enjoying the book by the time you're halfway through at least.